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Author: FredMan Subject: Birth Control Methods
Cindy17
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Registered: 12-14-2007
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posted on 12-14-2007 at 18:24 Reply With Quote Report Post to Moderator
Birth Control Methods

Hello, I am 17 and thinging about having sex for the first time. What birth control methods are recomended?
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DrDrew
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posted on 12-14-2007 at 18:30 Reply With Quote Report Post to Moderator
Birth Control Medthods

There are many methods of birth control. Learn about the different kinds of birth control to help you choose the best one for you. When making your choice, also consider that only a condom will protect you from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). To protect yourself and your partner against STDs, use a condom (along with your chosen birth control method) every time you have sex.

Hormonal methods
Hormonal methods are very reliable means of birth control. Hormonal methods use two basic formulas:


  • Combination hormonal methods contain both estrogen and progestin (synthetic progesterone). Combination methods include pills ("the Pill"), skin patches, and rings.
    Progestin-only hormonal methods include pills, also called "mini-pills," and injections (Depo-Provera). If you cannot take estrogen, a progestin-only method may be an option for you. See information about the progestin-only Mirena intrauterine device (IUD) below under IUDs.
  • Combination and progestin-only methods are prescribed for women for different reasons. Compare the recommendations for and against combination and progestin-only hormonal birth control pills, patches, and rings. Each type of method has its pros and cons.


Combination pills may reduce acne, pain during ovulation, and premenstrual symptoms. Both types of pill reduce heavy bleeding and cramping. Unlike the combination pill, the progestin-only pill can be taken by almost all women, including those who are breast-feeding, although it must be taken at the same time each day to be effective. (Combination pills are also taken daily but without as much attention to the time of day.) When you first start taking either type of birth control pill, it is necessary to use a backup birth control method for the first week.
Patches or vaginal rings are similar to combination pills, but they don't require taking a daily pill. The patch is changed weekly, and the ring is changed monthly (with 1 week off after 3 weeks of use).
One type of birth control pill called YAZ or Yasmin reduces severe mood and physical symptoms that some women get before they start their monthly periods.4 These symptoms are called premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). YAZ has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating PMDD symptoms.
The progestin-only (Depo-Provera) shot does not require taking a daily pill. Instead, you see your health professional once every 3 months for the injection.
Intrauterine device (IUD)
An intrauterine device (IUD) is a small device that is placed in the uterus to prevent pregnancy. IUDs are wrapped with copper (Copper T 380-A) or contain a hormone (the Mirena IUD releases a progestin called levonorgestrel). Once an IUD is in place, it can provide birth control for 5 to 10 years, depending on the type. Unlike IUDs that were used in the 1970s, present-day IUDs are small, safe, and highly effective.

If a sexually transmitted disease is present at the time the IUD is inserted, the infection can be carried into the uterus. This can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which can lead to infertility.5The progestin IUD (Mirena) typically reduces menstrual flow and cramping over time. On the other hand, the copper IUD can cause longer and heavier periods. However, the progestin IUD can have other side effects, including spotting, mood swings, and breast tenderness. These side effects occur less frequently than with other progestin-only methods.

Barrier methods
Barrier methods (including the diaphragm; cervical cap; Lea's Shield; male condom; female condom; and spermicidal foam, sponge, gel, suppository, or film) prevent sperm from entering the uterus and reaching the egg. Typically, barrier methods are not highly effective, but they generally have fewer side effects than hormonal methods or IUDs. Spermicides and condoms should be used together or along with another method to increase their effectiveness. Barrier methods can interrupt lovemaking because they must be used every time you have sex.

Condoms (male or female) should always be used if you are at risk of getting or spreading a sexually transmitted disease, such as genital herpes, chlamydia, or HIV.

Fertility awareness (periodic abstinence or natural family planning)
Fertility awareness requires that a couple chart the time during a woman's menstrual cycle when she is most likely to become pregnant and avoid intercourse or use a barrier method during that time. Fertility awareness is not a good choice if you need a highly effective form of birth control.

Breast-feeding may work as a form of birth control in the first 6 months after giving birth if you follow specific guidelines. For this method to work, you must breast-feed your baby every time. You can't use formula or other supplements. This is called the lactational amenorrhea method (LAM). Although LAM has been shown to be 98.5% effective when these conditions are met, many doctors recommend that you use another birth control method.6

Permanent birth control (sterilization)
Sterilization is a surgical procedure done for men or women who decide that they do not want to have any (or more) children. Sterilization is one of the most effective forms of birth control. Sterilization is intended to be permanent, and although you can try to reverse it with another surgery, reversal is not always successful.

Tubal ligation or implants. Tubal ligation is a surgical procedure where the fallopian tubes, which carry the eggs from the ovaries to the uterus, are tied, cut, or blocked. A new nonsurgical sterilization technique uses a small metal coil, or tubal implant, inserted up into each fallopian tube. Over time, scar tissue grows around each tubal implant, permanently blocking the tubes. Most women are able to return home within a couple of hours after either procedure. You must use another form of birth control for 3 months after receiving tubal implants. Sometimes tubal implants can require a repeat procedure.
Vasectomy. In this minor surgery, the vas deferens, the tubes that carry sperm from the testicles to the seminal fluid (semen), are cut and blocked so that the semen no longer contains sperm. This does not interfere with a man's ability to have an erection or enjoy sex.
Female sterilization is more complicated, has higher risks of problems after surgery, and is more expensive than male sterilization.

Contraception following pregnancy
Birth control is an important consideration after you have had a child. Your ability to become pregnant again may return within 3 to 6 weeks after childbirth. Think about what type of birth control you will be using, and make a plan during your pregnancy. Start using birth control as soon as possible after childbirth. Most methods of birth control can be started soon after childbirth, although some may not be recommended if you are breast-feeding.

Understanding conception
You can best evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods of birth control when you understand:

There are many methods of birth control. Learn about the different kinds of birth control to help you choose the best one for you. When making your choice, also consider that only a condom will protect you from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). To protect yourself and your partner against STDs, use a condom (along with your chosen birth control method) every time you have sex.

Hormonal methods
Hormonal methods are very reliable means of birth control. Hormonal methods use two basic formulas:


  • Combination hormonal methods contain both estrogen and progestin (synthetic progesterone). Combination methods include pills ("the Pill"), skin patches, and rings.
    Progestin-only hormonal methods include pills, also called "mini-pills," and injections (Depo-Provera). If you cannot take estrogen, a progestin-only method may be an option for you. See information about the progestin-only Mirena intrauterine device (IUD) below under IUDs.
  • Combination and progestin-only methods are prescribed for women for different reasons. Compare the recommendations for and against combination and progestin-only hormonal birth control pills, patches, and rings. Each type of method has its pros and cons.


Combination pills may reduce acne, pain during ovulation, and premenstrual symptoms. Both types of pill reduce heavy bleeding and cramping. Unlike the combination pill, the progestin-only pill can be taken by almost all women, including those who are breast-feeding, although it must be taken at the same time each day to be effective. (Combination pills are also taken daily but without as much attention to the time of day.) When you first start taking either type of birth control pill, it is necessary to use a backup birth control method for the first week.
Patches or vaginal rings are similar to combination pills, but they don't require taking a daily pill. The patch is changed weekly, and the ring is changed monthly (with 1 week off after 3 weeks of use).
One type of birth control pill called YAZ or Yasmin reduces severe mood and physical symptoms that some women get before they start their monthly periods.4 These symptoms are called premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). YAZ has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating PMDD symptoms.
The progestin-only (Depo-Provera) shot does not require taking a daily pill. Instead, you see your health professional once every 3 months for the injection.
Intrauterine device (IUD)
An intrauterine device (IUD) is a small device that is placed in the uterus to prevent pregnancy. IUDs are wrapped with copper (Copper T 380-A) or contain a hormone (the Mirena IUD releases a progestin called levonorgestrel). Once an IUD is in place, it can provide birth control for 5 to 10 years, depending on the type. Unlike IUDs that were used in the 1970s, present-day IUDs are small, safe, and highly effective.

If a sexually transmitted disease is present at the time the IUD is inserted, the infection can be carried into the uterus. This can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which can lead to infertility.5The progestin IUD (Mirena) typically reduces menstrual flow and cramping over time. On the other hand, the copper IUD can cause longer and heavier periods. However, the progestin IUD can have other side effects, including spotting, mood swings, and breast tenderness. These side effects occur less frequently than with other progestin-only methods.

Barrier methods
Barrier methods (including the diaphragm; cervical cap; Lea's Shield; male condom; female condom; and spermicidal foam, sponge, gel, suppository, or film) prevent sperm from entering the uterus and reaching the egg. Typically, barrier methods are not highly effective, but they generally have fewer side effects than hormonal methods or IUDs. Spermicides and condoms should be used together or along with another method to increase their effectiveness. Barrier methods can interrupt lovemaking because they must be used every time you have sex.

Condoms (male or female) should always be used if you are at risk of getting or spreading a sexually transmitted disease, such as genital herpes, chlamydia, or HIV.

Fertility awareness (periodic abstinence or natural family planning)
Fertility awareness requires that a couple chart the time during a woman's menstrual cycle when she is most likely to become pregnant and avoid intercourse or use a barrier method during that time. Fertility awareness is not a good choice if you need a highly effective form of birth control.

Breast-feeding may work as a form of birth control in the first 6 months after giving birth if you follow specific guidelines. For this method to work, you must breast-feed your baby every time. You can't use formula or other supplements. This is called the lactational amenorrhea method (LAM). Although LAM has been shown to be 98.5% effective when these conditions are met, many doctors recommend that you use another birth control method.6

Permanent birth control (sterilization)
Sterilization is a surgical procedure done for men or women who decide that they do not want to have any (or more) children. Sterilization is one of the most effective forms of birth control. Sterilization is intended to be permanent, and although you can try to reverse it with another surgery, reversal is not always successful.

Tubal ligation or implants. Tubal ligation is a surgical procedure where the fallopian tubes, which carry the eggs from the ovaries to the uterus, are tied, cut, or blocked. A new nonsurgical sterilization technique uses a small metal coil, or tubal implant, inserted up into each fallopian tube. Over time, scar tissue grows around each tubal implant, permanently blocking the tubes. Most women are able to return home within a couple of hours after either procedure. You must use another form of birth control for 3 months after receiving tubal implants. Sometimes tubal implants can require a repeat procedure.
Vasectomy. In this minor surgery, the vas deferens, the tubes that carry sperm from the testicles to the seminal fluid (semen), are cut and blocked so that the semen no longer contains sperm. This does not interfere with a man's ability to have an erection or enjoy sex.
Female sterilization is more complicated, has higher risks of problems after surgery, and is more expensive than male sterilization.

Contraception following pregnancy
Birth control is an important consideration after you have had a child. Your ability to become pregnant again may return within 3 to 6 weeks after childbirth. Think about what type of birth control you will be using, and make a plan during your pregnancy. Start using birth control as soon as possible after childbirth. Most methods of birth control can be started soon after childbirth, although some may not be recommended if you are breast-feeding.

Understanding conception
You can best evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods of birth control when you understand:

How pregnancy occurs.
How each method prevents pregnancy.

DR Drew


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2medicure
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Registered: 05-11-2012
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posted on 05-16-2012 at 08:42 Reply With Quote Report Post to Moderator
Birth control methods

Generic yasmin is chemically composed of drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol. These tow chemicals mimic the action of the hormones produced naturally by the body and hence has the same action. This is a combination birth control drug and it works by suppressing the goandotropins which releases sex hormones. Primary action of this anti pregnancy pill is inhibition of ovulation that is release of ovum; It also brings changes in the cervical mucus that makes it difficult for sperms to enter in the uterus and the endometrium which results in the decrease in the chances of implantation. This is the mechanism of action of Yasmin (Drospirenone and Ethinyl Estradiol). It should be taken after consulting with doctor. It is also available in the generic version and known as generic yasmin. The generic version is available at online drug store.



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Girlygirl
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Registered: 10-26-2012
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posted on 10-26-2012 at 10:08 Reply With Quote Report Post to Moderator
Just swallow

HI, I find it best just to let him cum in my mouth or some times in my butt. He does not like to using a condom and I do not like taking the pill. We have been using this method for over a year now and it is working very well. I love it when he cums in my mouth, it really turns me on, especially when we 69.
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TheJester
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Posts: 4
Registered: 10-22-2013
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posted on 10-22-2013 at 09:56 Reply With Quote Report Post to Moderator
Many options to avoid preganacy

'HI, I find it best just to let him cum in my mouth or some times in my butt. He does not like to using a condom and I do not like taking the pill. We have been using this method for over a year now and it is working very well. I love it when he cums in my mouth, it really turns me on, especially when we 69.'

Yes I Have to agree with GirlyGirl, so many option during sex to avoid pregnancy. Girls with this many options there is no reason every to get pregnant. I also love 69 and and anal. I like to start off with lots of four play, then about 30 to 60 minutes of vagina sex then finish her month and anus. 69 is a great way to finish, Go Girly Girl :)

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FredMan
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Registered: 05-25-2014
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posted on 06-26-2014 at 15:44 Reply With Quote Report Post to Moderator
withdrawing early..

QUOTE I find it best just to let him cum in my mouth or some times in my butt. He does not like to using a condom and I do not like taking the pill. We have been using this method for over a year now and it is working very well. I love it when he cums in my mouth, it really turns me on, especially when we 69.'
UNQUOTE

Many girls let their guys enter & fuck them but before entering, ask them to pull-out "just in time" before their cum flows.

For some, it's "easier on the conscience" if the guy doesn't cum in them, thus not "sealing" the deal as cum in the vagina signifies some sort of "finality" (in case the gal doesn't believe in sex before marriage).

He enters & thrusts and goes as long as he can.
Just before he feels he's about to cum, he pulls out, & shoots his spermy cum all over her tummy. Some may spatter on her bush.

Am curious women's experiences with this.

If they feel "safe" letting a guy fuck them hard but withdraw just before cumming.

Or... if some guys "promise" to pull-out but change their minds & push their life-giving cum deep into their unprotected vaginas. Imagine the gal doesn't stop the guy bec. the sensations feel so good, though she clearly understands what's happening and is nervous knowing she isn't using BC as he fills her with his potent cum..
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